Tuesday
17
February
2015

Telegraph: Designer wars

 

 

 

I reviewed two fantastically readable new biographies about Alexander McQueen and John Galliano for the Telegraph. One, Alexander McQueen: Blood Beneath the Skin by Andrew Wilson, looks at the truth behind all the myth-making around McQueen. And the other, Gods and Kings by Dana Thomas, contrasts their two lives — and credits them both with establishing (and then killing off) an influential era for fashion. Two great reads — equal to something I reviewed a few months ago on McQueen, Marc Jacobs and Kate Moss: Champagne Supernovas. Also worth a look. 

 

 

Sunday
15
February
2015

Observer: Fifty Shades of Grey review

 

Nothing against the actors. The actors are rarely at fault. But there is not much good to say about this (awful) film. But what there is to say is here in the Observer, with his n’ hers takes. 

Friday
02
January
2015

Jan 2: Should You Read War and Peace?

 

 

I am not the best person to answer the question. Because I have not read War and Peace. (YES. I KNOW. THE SHAME.*) But I’m a good person to put the question because I’m a fluent Russian speaker, I have lived in Russia and known many Russians. And I have not read War and Peace. And I have not suffered as a result. 

 Or so it seemed to me until this year. Here’s the trouble: this is the year of War and Peace. It’s the 145th anniversary of the novel’s publication in 1869. There’s a BBC Radio 4 jamboree celebrating the 1,400-page saga currently on air. And this autumn there’s a huge BBC 1 adaptation, produced by Harvey Weinstein and starring Adrian Edmondson, Greta Scacchi, Downton Abbey’s Lily James, screenplay by (of course) Andrew “Pride and Prejudice” Davies. So if there was ever a time to read War and Peace, this is it. 

 The good news? Andrew Marr loves it so much he has read it 15 times. And Anna Karenina is a lifelong favourite novel and truly not a difficult read. So how different can War and Peace be? Right? Right. The bad news? It’s 1,400 pages. And has some bad Amazon reviews (see below for an extract from the worst-reviewed Amazon classics): “Highly disappointed and utterly disgusted.”

Verdict: it must be read and this is achievable by autumn. Also recommended: Tolstoy’s “secrets to a happy life” and this very funny exploration of who has and hasn’t read War and Peace by Tanya Gold from 2005

 * I feel no shame. Read what you want not what you feel you should.

Pic: Audrey Hepburn and Mel Ferrer in the 1955 film of War and Peace.


 

 

 

 

Monday
08
December
2014

Christmas Shows and 2015

 

 

 Now booking for next year: Leicester Comedy Festival (left) — my new show Say Sorry to the Lady — Sunday Feb 15: 

Meanwhile… Just a few shows left to go before Christmas… I’m at Scotch Egg impro with People People on Wed 10 Dec at The Alma in Stoke Newington. On Sun 14 Dec see People People at City Impro at The Water Poet at 5.30pm and at the Free Association at The De Beauvoir Arms in N1 from 8pm. 

The last Dead Parrot Society is on Fri Dec 19 at The Anglers in Teddington from 8pm with a fantastic bill, including Joe Jacobs. He was just in the finals of JW3’s Jewish Comedian of the Year which I was judging last weekend and I like him a lot. 

Sunday
07
December
2014

Books of the Year 2014

 

 

Here’s my list of the top 10 books of 2014 from the Observer. I plump for The Miniaturist by Jessie Burton as the Read of the Year, a wonderful debut novel. As suggested, I’m not saying that The Miniaturist is perfect. It has been a controversial book in some ways, which is what worries me slightly about debut novels becoming massive: they get over-hyped and over-scrutinised and then when people eventually get round to reading it, they’re disappointed because it’s not the greatest thing they ever read in the history of the world ever ever. (Which it can’t be because it’s a debut.) It’s a tricky situation because in order to get anyone interested in debut novels at all, publishers really do have to pull out all the stops and they did on this book. Still, it is the book of the year for its immense success – and it’s an enjoyable read. Indeed.

Saturday
20
September
2014

Downton’s back

 

 

God help me, I am reviewing Downton Abbey for the FIFTH SERIES, starting tomorrow. If you want to catch up on the last thing we saw (Christmas special 2013), the review is here — warning: spoilers. Secondary warning; it was the one where we saw Carson’s ankles. Remember? Yes, we would all rather forget. Not that he didn’t have lovely ankles. He did. It was just a very weak and disappointing episode. As so many of them are.

Regular readers will know that I have come to love to hate this strange phenomenon, which has recently morphed into what I described this week in the Guardian as “the UK’s most toxic cultural export.” The new series starts tomorrow night and the review of the first episode goes up as soon as the credits roll. Pass the petits fours.

One person who seems to have escaped at the right time at least is Dan Stevens: I interviewed him about his roles in The Guest and A Walk Among the Tombstones this autumn and his new life in Brooklyn, where he couldn’t be further away from the life of Matthew Crawley if he tried. And where he eats a lot of vegan food and has a military-style fitness regime. I don’t feel Dame Maggie would approve.

Wednesday
10
September
2014

Upcoming events

 

 

I’m working on a couple of new show ideas at the moment so I’m doing new material gigs and impro nights. Some of these are under the radar. (And you would know why if you came to them.) Sometimes they’re on my Twitter feed or Facebook page. I’m performing the last outing of I Laughed, I Cried: The Edinburgh Show at Sheffield’s Off the Shelf Festival on Sunday 19 October, 7.30pm. More news soon of Comedy Royale, a new gig celebrating the best of London’s impro scene, coming to St James’ Theatre on Thurs Nov 27 – save the date! And I can be found every other Friday at Teddington’s rockin’ Dead Parrot Society in our new riverside home, The Anglers (between Teddington Lock and Teddington Studios).

Friday
15
August
2014

Edinburgh 2014

 

Aaaaargh. 33 shows in 12 days. Highlights: Hanging out in the Green Room at the BBC with Arlene Phillips and Pamela Stephenson ahead of Radio 4’s Front Row. MCing for Zoe Lyons (below), Mrs Barbara Nice and a host of amazing acts at Mary Bourke’s brilliant group show Funny for a Grrrl at Stand in the Square. MCing in a packed 300-seater Spiegeltent (below) at the Book Festival. (Everyone flooded straight out of George R R Martin into our show.) Doing battle with the Tattoo every night in Freestival’s Cowgatehead during my show I Laughed, I Cried: about 15 minutes of it was dominated by the deafening sound of fireworks. (Weapons for fightback, dispersed to audience: balloons, party poppers and Hobnobs.) Loved North Berwick on my day off (below). And became obsessed with the moo yang (sticky pork) at Ting Thai Caravan (Teviot Place). 

Wednesday
30
July
2014

Latitude 2014

 

 

Not the best kind of Festival person (see Glastonbury 2013, where I wore a white (soon-to-be-brown-with-mud) chiffon dress). But I loved the pink Suffolk skies above Latitude. Busy, packed 200-seater Lit Tent for I Laughed, I Cried (reading from the book and bits from the show) on the Sunday night. Even if most people were lying on the floor asleep. Feared mass exodus halfway through as The Black Keys were playing at the same time. But this didn’t happen. Had to hastily rewrite a whole section in my head as I realised there was a seven-year-old sitting in the front row and I was just about to reference the word “orgasm”.

Monday
30
June
2014

I Laughed, I Cried in paperback

 

 

 The paperback of I Laughed, I Cried has landed (order here from Amazon: five-star average OF COURSE). I was on Loose Ends on BBC Radio 4 talking to Clive Anderson about the book and the Edinburgh show on 11 July. See William Leith’s review in the Evening Standard: “a lovely, captivating account”: “This isn’t just a good book about how to become a comic; on another level, it’s a good book about tackling any life challenge.” I wrote about the change between the two covers (from trade paperback (“Laughing and Crying” cover) to paperback, where I’m picture wearing a great deal of make-up) here. I still prefer the first cover. Said Tracey Beaker.

 

 

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